"This research addressed a virtual absence of health status and health care use data for Aboriginal people. That's a huge gap!"

                                         Dr. Janet Smylie

QUICK FACTS FROM OUR HEALTH COUNTS

Emergency Room Use

First Nations more likely to use Emergency Room (ER) to access health care

People are usi....

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Health Care Access

“Our health deserves appropriate and dedicated care”

There is an urgent need for impr....

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Chronic Disease & Disability

First Nations people are carrying a greater health burden and at a younger age

Poor healt....

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Violence & abuse reported

58% report violence is part of their community 

95% feel violence is related to crim....

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Impact of Colonization

Legacy of colonization & residential schools impacts health, wellbeing & family cohesion<....

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Social Determinants of Health

First Nation people have less access to the social determinants of health

Social determin....

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Income & employment

28% of First Nations people in Hamilton have an income from wages & salaries

8% of Fi....

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Education/Employment

First Nations people have low levels of formal education:

57% First Nations adults over 1....

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Housing Impacts Health

“I live entirely off food banks, that’s where nutrition comes in, I have no choice over my fo....

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First Nations Demographics

13, 735 people in Hamilton report having Aboriginal ancestry (Census 2006)This is likely a signif....

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A call to action on First Nations health...

Our Health Counts: Urban Aboriginal Database Research Project

Our Health Counts is a unique, collaborative research project developed by OUR First Nations community for the benefit of OUR people. It is the culmination of two and half years of work, bringing to light missing population-based health information on First Nations adults and children living in an urban setting. Seven hundred and ninety people living in the city of Hamilton participated in detailed discussions to help us better understand how their health, housing, poverty, history of colonization and culture intersect.

As a community, we know that the income levels, employment, housing and health of First Nations people fall well below broader community standards. And that we are receiving unequal access to health and social service - particular services that are culturally sensitive and delivered by culturally competent health care providers. We know that traditional survey tools have underreported this impact. But 'knowing' has not been enough to bring about needed policy, funding and practice changes.  Our Health Counts captures striking levels of poverty and health disparities among First Nations residents living in Hamilton. It also captures the remarkable cultural continuity and resiliency of our community members, despite the tremendous challenges they confront.  

Our Health Counts is a call to action for all levels of government, service providers, and policy planners to work collaboratively with the First Nations community and its leaders to address the devastating systemic health, social inequalities and disparities experienced by urban Aboriginal people.

Constance McKnight, Executive Director, De dwa da dehs nye's Aboriginal Health Centre

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